Insularity and Empire in Ottoman Cyprus

A podcast with Antonis Hadjikyriacou, hosted by Michael Talbot

Cyprus in the 16th-century Kitab-ı Bahriye (Book of Navigation) of Piri Reis, an Ottoman admiral. Source: Wikipedia

The history of Mediterranean islands offers a dynamic paradox of insularity engendered by geographical isolation and connectivity fostered by access to ports and maritime networks. In this podcast, Antonis Hadjikyriacou and Michael Talbot discuss those themes through a conversation about the transformation of Cyprus over the centuries of Ottoman imperial rule. Antonis Hadjikyriacou has studied the history of Cyprus from the earliest years of Ottoman rule during the late 16th century into the 19th century. In the interview, they explore agricultural production and political economy in Cyprus through geo-spatial analysis of early Ottoman documentation and consider how the local politics and economy of Cyprus were situated in a changing Mediterranean.

Listen to the podcast below or go to the Ottoman History Podcast.

Antonis Hadjikyriacou held a guest lecture at our Transregional Academy “Deframing the Mediterranean” on the same topic. He is Marie Curie Intra-European fellow at the Institute for Mediterranean Studies, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas. He earned his Phd in History from SOAS, University of London, and he has previously worked and taught at Princeton University, SOAS, the University of Crete, and the University of Cyprus. Ηe is currently completing his monograph entitled Insularity and Empire: Ottoman Cyprus in the Early Modern Mediterranean.

Michael Talbot received his PhD from SOAS in 2013 for a thesis on Ottoman-British relations in the eighteenth century, and now lectures and researches on a range of topics in Ottoman history at the University of Greenwich in London.


Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.